Are Soft Running Shoes Good for You? Researchers Weigh In

Posted by on Monday, October 22nd, 2018

Are soft running shoes good for you? A new study published in The Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine found that one type of running shoe increases the risk of lower leg pain and injury more than others. The research by the Functional Orthopedic Research Center of Excellence (FORCE Lab) at Oregon State University-Cascades is the first of its kind to take such a rigorous look at the impact of maximal shoes.

Are Soft Running Shoes Good for You?
Hoka is the most well-known maximalist shoe, but could it be associated with greater risk of injury? [Image Source: Shopify.com]

Heel Fracture Treatment and the Risk of Arthritis After Surgery

Posted by on Friday, August 10th, 2018

Here at The Center for Podiatric Care and Sports Medicine, a heel fracture is referred to as a “calcaneal fracture.” We most commonly see this type of fracture resulting from a car accident or a fall from a ladder. However, we’ve also diagnosed calcaneal stress fractures in long-distance runners, ballet dancers, and athletes who participate in sports involving jumping. Calcaneal injuries continue to be one of the most complex in podiatry, and there is no widely accepted consensus on the best way to manage heel fracture treatment and avoid complications, though it is an area of considerable research.

heel fracture treatment
Subtalar arthrodesis is a common approach to calcaneal fracture, but will you develop post-traumatic arthritis? [Image Source: WheelessOnline.com]

New Wearable Device Detects Achilles Tendon Problems Before They Occur

Posted by on Monday, July 9th, 2018

Mechanical engineers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have developed promising new technology that can measure the underlying tension forces transferred to the muscles and tendons during movement. Previous studies on animals used surgical implants to monitor force, but the invasiveness has been a major drawback for human trials. The new non-invasive measurement tool builds upon existing knowledge of wave propagation measurements to detect Achilles tendon problems before they occur.

Achilles tendon problems
Promising new technology that can measure the underlying tension forces transferred to the muscles and tendons during movement will be valuable during gait analysis. [Image Source: Unsplash user Bradley Wentzel]

Exploring the Link Between Foot Pain and Weight Gain

Posted by on Monday, December 18th, 2017

Foot pain can make it seem impossible to lose weight. After all, who wants to exercise when they can’t even stay on their feet comfortably?

A recent study published in the Journal of Foot and Ankle Research found a “strong association” between obesity and chronic plantar heel pain. Over a two-year span, they examined whether changes in body weight corresponded with changes in foot pressure and if such fluctuations in body weight were associated with changes in foot pain intensity or limited function. The study confirmed an unfortunate fact: foot pain and weight gain are, indeed, closely connected. So what can we do with this information, and how can overweight individuals overcome such pain in order to reach a healthy weight?

It can be difficult to get on track with fitness when increased weight is associated with foot pain.
It can be difficult to get on track with fitness when increased weight is associated with foot pain. Image Source: Pixabay user taniadimas.

Hip, Knee, and Foot Pain: How Foot Issues Can Lead to Other Lower Body Injuries

Posted by on Monday, November 13th, 2017

Researchers at the Hospital for Special Surgery and Harvard Medical School recently took another look at the results of the Framingham Foot Study to see if there was a correlation between foot, knee, and hip pain. Their paper appeared in the Journal of the American Podiatric Medical Association to provide practitioners with evidence-based guidelines for treating their patients. Not surprisingly, the study found what we have noticed in our NYC foot and ankle sports medicine clinic for years: there IS a significant association between foot pain and pain in the knees and hips.

The foot is the foundation of the kinetic chain.
The foot is the foundation of the kinetic chain, according to researchers and sports medicine doctors in NYC. Image Source: Unsplash user Lucas Sankey.

How Much Does Running Improve Life Expectancy?

Posted by on Friday, July 28th, 2017

Dr. Josef J. Geldwert isn’t just a doctor at The Center for Podiatric Care and Sports Medicine offices in Manhattan and White Plains; he is also a life-long distance runner with marathon training experience. For this reason, he is frequently consulted by athletes entering the Olympic trials and organizations like the NY Road Runners, in addition to working with events such as the NYC Triathlon.

Most people are surprised to learn that Dr. Geldwert is almost 70-years-old, as active as he is. “I love a good Central Park workout!” he confesses. He is particularly interested in the latest research about the many health benefits of running, not to mention ways to keep himself and his patients running well into old age.

Iowa State University researchers published a new review and analysis of existing research about the impact of exercise on premature death in the journal Progress in Cardiovascular Disease. Their findings validate the idea that running has huge benefits on life expectancy.

Running adds YEARS onto your life, according to NYC sports medicine doctor Josef J. Geldwert, DPM.
Running adds YEARS onto your life, according to NYC sports medicine doctor Josef J. Geldwert, DPM.

What are the Possible Drawbacks of Nonoperative Treatment for Achilles Tendon Rupture?

Posted by on Friday, July 14th, 2017

For many foot and ankle conditions, conservative treatment is the way to go. However, this is not necessarily the case for Achilles tendon ruptures. A study published in the American Journal of Sports Medicine in May 2017 linked nonoperative treatment of Achilles tendon ruptures with soleus muscle atrophy. NYC foot surgeons from The Center for Podiatric Care and Sports Medicine discuss the latest research.

Nonoperative treatment of Achilles tendon ruptures can sometimes negatively affect the calf muscles.
Nonoperative treatment of Achilles tendon ruptures can sometimes negatively affect the calf muscles. Image Source: Pixabay user cocoparisienne.

Is Caffeine Bad for Runners’ Feet? Health Considerations for Athletes Who Drink Coffee

Posted by on Friday, March 4th, 2016

In a recent study by the University of Georgia, researchers concluded that the caffeine in a morning cup of coffee can increase endurance by up to 24 percent. Their research indicated that a cup of coffee can have the same ergogenic benefits as a caffeine pill. Of course, there can be too much of a good thing. Our NYC podiatrists often treat runners who suffer from the ill effects of a pre-race caffeine boost, and runners should be aware of the possible health consequences of drinking excessive amounts of coffee.

The Effects of Caffeine on Sports Performance from Kathryn Thomson on Vimeo.

How Regenerative Medicine Earned a Place at the Sports Doctor’s Table

Posted by on Monday, September 29th, 2014

“Regenerative medicine” is a branch of research that involves molecular biology, tissue engineering, and the process of replacing human cells, tissues, or organs to establish normal function. It has been decades since the first bone marrow and organ transplants, but advances in this science have unlocked new opportunities for more applications than the treatment of chronic diseases. The sports doctors at The Center for Podiatric Care & Sports Medicine in New York City use regenerative medicine to heal our patients’ sports injuries as well.

sports medicine treatments
Innovative sports medicine treatments such as platelet-rich plasma injections are helping people overcome chronic overuse injuries.
Image Source: Wikimedia.org

 

Barefoot Running May Be More Dangerous Than We Thought

Posted by on Tuesday, March 19th, 2013

I think at this point we can all agree that barefoot running has taken the running world by storm. It’s everywhere you look: on the streets, on commercials, and on marathon runners (complementing their snazzy custom outfits). But until recently, there hasn’t been good evidence about barefoot running’s safety. Many athletes, podiatrists, trainers, and talking heads have touted its benefits, often citing very official-sounding biomechanical data. They argue that the foot and leg respond to the rigors of pad-less running by cushioning steps the way they were meant to be cushioned: with ankles, knees, and hips. After all, back in the caveman years we weren’t wearing padded sneakers. We were built for barefoot running!