Want To Lower Inflammation? Start Running!

Posted by on Wednesday, January 4th, 2017

Osteoarthritis, which affects 27 million Americans, is a runner’s worst nightmare. Nothing takes away your love of the race more than a stiff, inflamed knee that sears and throbs with every stride. There is good news from Brigham Young University researchers: the more you run, the less likely you are to suffer from joint inflammation! “It flies in the face of intuition,” admits study co-author Matt Seeley, but the results of their study suggests it may be a myth that long-distance running is bad for your knees.

knee inflammation
Want to protect your knees from osteoarthritis? Start running! Image Source: Wikimedia.org

A Specialist’s Perspective: Is Your Leg and Knee Pain Caused by Weak Feet?

Posted by on Friday, June 5th, 2015

If you were to visit a general practitioner for leg and knee pain, you would likely walk out the door with a prescription for pain medication and a few friendly suggestions, such as “try to take it easy” or “do some basic stretching exercises each morning.” The problem with this approach is that you’re just treating the symptoms and not addressing the biomechanical root of the problem. Family doctors can’t be faulted for this Band-Aid approach to leg and knee pain. They are busy doing damage control on a wide range of issues and aren’t able to specialize in every area of human anatomy. That’s why seeking medical attention from a specialist like sports medicine doctors and podiatrists is important for these kinds of injuries. The Center for Podiatric Care and Sports Medicine receives many referrals from doctors whose patients complain of leg and knee problems, which are often traced back to weakness or structural abnormalities in the feet.

knee pain
Note how the entire body alignment shifts when there is a muscular imbalance in the foot.
Image Source: Bodyworxphysio.com.au

Study Looks At Cost Saving Opportunities For ACL Injuries

Posted by on Thursday, October 24th, 2013

Each year, more than 200,000 ACL injuries take down active young athletes. The Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) is one of the four major ligaments in the knee that works to prevent the shin bone from sliding out in front of the thigh bone.

ACL injuries often “pop” when there is a hard hit on the side of the knee (think football tackle!), when the knee is overextended, or when there is a quick stop-and-change-direction movement. Swelling and pain are the first signs that the ligament has been overstretched or torn. The knee feels unstable and seems to “give way” when walking.

A new study published this month in the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery offers new information for those considering or needing surgery.

anterior cruciate ligament
Image Source: Walgreens.com

Can A Sports Doctor Save Your Knees After an ACL Injury?

Posted by on Monday, October 14th, 2013

We  tend to think of ACL injuries as freak occurrences that are bound to happen when one plays competitive sports. However, it’s not just a matter of time for these athletes. The causative factors leading to such injuries can often be addressed ahead of time and remedied before a devastating injury sidelines a player. The Center for Podiatric Care and Sports Medicine is on the leading edge of treating ACL sports injuries.

acl injuries
Image Souce: IaamSports.com

Knee Operation Technology: Banish Knee Pain With Microfracture Surgery

Posted by on Friday, September 6th, 2013

Do you ever wonder how professional athletes sustain such terrible physical injuries, but seem to return to the game in no time at all? One of the secret weapons we use here at our NYC Center for Podiatric Care and Sports Medicine is the microfracture knee operation. Recently, the Texans’ third-round pick, Brennan Williams, underwent knee microfracture surgery after a May 11th knee injury during the second day of training camp sidelined him with severe pain and inflammation.

Ditch That Limp: Seven Amazing Ways Foot Orthotics Can Relieve Your Knee Pain

Posted by on Friday, August 30th, 2013

Tired of gimping around town? Well, shoe orthotics just may be in the cards for you, then! Many of the clients who come to our NYC podiatric center imagine that they’ll need surgery to address their knee pain, but are surprised to find that something so simple can alleviate their troubles within just a few weeks. We can make a cast of your feet right here in our office and have a pair of custom orthotics made just for you that can be removed and put in almost any shoes you own. From there on out, it’s pain-free walking!

What Are Orthotics?

Foot orthotics are a shoe insert that provides added arch and heel support. Molded from a strong, durable leather, this custom insole changes the biomechanics of the foot and corrects alignment all the way up through your knee, back muscles and spine. There are over-the-counter insoles made by Dr. Scholls, but those are not made to fit your unique footprint. A good pair of orthotics can last you five to ten years. Every two years, a cobbler can refurbish them for a small price. Your insurance will likely pick up at least half the tab.

How Orthotics Can Help Your Knee Pain

– Orthotics evenly distribute the weight on the bottom of your feet, which changes the distribution of force all the way to your knee. In  other words, your knees take less of a pounding!

– Orthotics are made of shock-absorbing material that further reduces the stress of the hard ground on your knees.

– Orthotics control excessive pronation if your feet have a tendency to roll inward as you walk or run. Overpronation causes a rotation that goes all the way up through your knee and even to your back.

– Orthotics can correct biomechanical or structural instability in your feet and ankles to prevent knee pain.

– Orthotics limit the amount of motion your feet make with each step, which reduces wear and tear on your joints.

– Orthotics promotes proper form when walking, which reduces inflammation and irritation.

– Orthotics align the foot properly at the ankle joint to prevent supination (when the ankle rolls away from the foot). This helps wearers prevent calluses and blisters, not to mention improve stability in the knee.

What Orthotics Can’t Do…

Orthotics are not a cure-all for every type of condition. We find it doesn’t really help treat osteoarthritis of the knee or knee cartilage degeneration very well, for example. Severe, acute pain can be treated in many other ways and we usually do not recommend orthotics until the immediate symptoms are relieved. If you’re curious about orthotics in NY, please call our office for a consultation.

Cross-Country Running: Injuries That Take A Heavy Toll On High School Girls

Posted by on Thursday, August 22nd, 2013

Cross-country running has the highest injury rate of any high school sport — even worse than football, wrestling and soccer. The NY Times cited a massive study of 60,000 high school athletes in Seattle, which ran from 1979 to 1992. The study found that one out of every three cross-country runners suffered an injury. On average, runners had two injuries per season.

Snowball Effect: Study Shows That a Second ACL Tear is Six Times More Likely Than A First

Posted by on Friday, August 16th, 2013

Chances are, you or someone you know has injured their Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) at some point. There are approximately 95,000 ACL ruptures each year. The ACL is one of the four most important strong ligaments connecting the bones of the knee joint together. It is comprised of strong, dense structures of connective tissue that stabilize and minimize stress on the joint, thereby preventing it from dislocating. Tears occur when this ligament becomes overstretched or strained.

What Causes ACL Injury?

Most people injure their ACL doing a physical activity or playing sports. It may be caused by a sudden stop and twisting / pivoting motion, a blow to the front of the knee, hyperextension of the knee, changing direction quickly, landing on the ground with the knee straight, or sudden deceleration while moving quickly. Skiing, volleyball, basketball, football, tennis, wrestling, gymnastics and running all increase the odds of suffering this type of sports injury. Car accidents or repeat trauma and small tearing over time can also cause ACL injuries.

Is ACL Surgery A Good Idea?

About half of the patients who suffer ACL injuries also have meniscal tears. ACL deficiency increases the likelihood of suffering from degenerative changes significantly. For this reason, 60,000 to 75,000 ACL surgeries are performed annually in the United States. The long-term success rate for ACL surgery is very good, at 75 – 95%, with stability and activity fully restored. The failure rate of 8% is related to complications such as recurrent instability, graft failure or arthrofibrosis. People who are only engaged in very light manual work and low-impact sports like cycling or who are sedentary may consider nonsurgical treatment. However, most people want to be able to jump, pivot, ski and participate in heavy manual work again in their lifetimes.

Second ACL Injury More Likely After Reconstruction

The likelihood of having to go through a second ACL surgery within 24 months is six times’ greater than the chances of having a tear in the first place, according to researchers presenting at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine’s Annual Meeting in Chicago. In the Cincinnati Children’s Hospital study, 78 subjects between the ages of 10 and 25 years old were assessed. Of them, 29.5% of the athletes suffered a second ACL injury within 24 months of resuming regular activities, including 20.5% sustaining an injury on the opposite leg and 9% tearing the same leg. Females were more than twice as likely to suffer an opposite leg injury than males. While ACL prevention programs are generally considered effective, the research suggests a need to reevaluate some of the rehabilitation programs out there, lead author Mark V. Paterno suggested.

A Snowball Effect: Study Shows That a Second ACL Tear is Six Times More Likely Than A First

Posted by on Friday, August 16th, 2013

Chances are, you or someone you know has injured their Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) at some point. There are approximately 95,000 ACL ruptures each year. The ACL is one of the four most important strong ligaments connecting the bones of the knee joint together. It is comprised of strong, dense structures of connective tissue that stabilize and minimize stress on the joint, thereby preventing it from dislocating. Tears occur when this ligament becomes overstretched or strained.

Ergonomic Equipment To Help Your Feet, Legs & Knees

Posted by on Monday, July 8th, 2013

Ergonomic design is an important area of study because it helps us to prevent injuries at work. Whether it be carpal tunnel from repetitive use, a stiff knee from sitting all day, or swollen feet, ergonomic products offer the best solutions science can offer. The CDC recommends incorporating healthy work tools, stretching and using proper posture to feel healthier and happier at work.