Tips for Bunion Sufferers: Break In Those New Boots for Better Fit and Comfort

Posted by on Friday, March 14th, 2014

A bunion is a deformity of the big toe involving a bony enlargement of the joint. Bunions are believed to have a hereditary component, but they can also be caused by ill-fitting shoes, foot trauma, arthritis, and disease. They are surprisingly common — affecting up to 55% of women in the U.S., according to the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society.

bunion treatment
If conventional bunion aid products have not helped your shoe fit, you may want to consider shoe stretching techniques or bunion surgery.
Image Source: AlphaOrthotics.com

 

Sometimes a bunion can be quite painful and require surgical intervention, but most people just deal with the unsightly lump. It can make shoe shopping a challenge, as most footwear will rub on a bunion. Yet, that doesn’t mean all new shoes have to hurt. There are a few ways for bunion sufferers to find relief.

Bunion Buys: 5 Great Products for Bunion Relief

Posted by on Friday, February 14th, 2014

Everyday items can become a hassle to purchase for people living with bunions. One blogger lamented the task of buying running shoes that could fit her misshapen big toe joint. A bunion doesn’t always necessarily hurt, but it is almost always inconvenient to have. Shoes don’t fit correctly. Walking can be difficult, let alone running or participating in sports. Many people opt to lead more sedentary lives to avoid the hassle altogether. We recommend tackling the problem head-on. There are plenty of bunion relief products out there geared toward making the lives of sufferers better!

Celebrities Have Foot Pain, Too! Victoria Beckham Prepares For Bunion Operation

Posted by on Thursday, October 31st, 2013

The Belfast Telegraph reports that former Spice Girl Victoria Beckham is considering bunion surgery to take care of her foot woes once and for all. The fashion designer is well-known for her love of high heels, but the joints of her big toes are so misaligned that she may have no other choice if she wants to find any shoes that fit comfortably now.

Victoria Beckham
Spice Girl Victoria Beckham loves her heels, but it’s come at a price! She will soon undergo bunion surgery.
Image source: wikimedia.org

Lasers Are No Cure for Bunions: How to Identify and Correct This Painful Foot Issue

Posted by on Thursday, September 19th, 2013

Patients often come into our NYC Center for Podiatric Care and Sports Medicine asking if they could have “laser bunion removal” done. Lasers are often considered to be the most advanced form of treatment, associated with the least amount of pain and quickest recovery time. While we can use lasers to zap away warts, toenail fungus, ingrown nails, callouses and neuromas, we cannot use lasers to “remove a bunion.” Over the years, great strides have  been made to reduce the pain, recovery time and scarring associated with the bunionectomy.

severe bunion
Image Source: HuffingtonPost.com

Running With Bunions- Getting Back on Track

Posted by on Monday, August 5th, 2013

A bunion may seem like a deal-breaker for an avid runner; but in reality, there are plenty of people out there running with bunions on their feet! In fact, we recently received a letter from a 61-year-old with large bunions who would like to start running her usual 10 miles per week again. She wondered how long it would take her to get back to her routine and what she should do if she starts experiencing bunion pain. Whether you’re hoping to win that half-marathon or just trying to stay in shape, there is no reason why feet bunions should hold you back.

Is This a Blister? Corn? Callus? It Might Be A Bunionette!

Posted by on Tuesday, July 30th, 2013

This time of year, we’re looking at our feet more carefully. Instead of cramming our tootsies into boots, we’re baring all in sandals. You may notice a little bump on the outside of the little toe. At first glance, you may think it’s a blister, a corn or a callus. Yet, over time, you may notice it’s actually bony in nature and it hurts quite a lot when you wear certain shoes. It’s possible you may have a bunionette or “tailor’s bunion,” as it is sometimes called.

Is This a Blister? Corn? Callus? It Might Be A Bunionette!

Posted by on Tuesday, July 30th, 2013

This time of year, we’re looking at our feet more carefully. Instead of cramming our tootsies into boots, we’re baring all in sandals. You may notice a little bump on the outside of the little toe. At first glance, you may think it’s a blister, a corn or a callus. Yet, over time, you may notice it’s actually bony in nature and it hurts quite a lot when you wear certain shoes. It’s possible you may have a bunionette or “tailor’s bunion,” as it is sometimes called.

Why Do They Call Bunionettes A “Tailor’s Bunion”?

Centuries ago, tailors sat in a cross-legged position on the floor for many hours as they worked. Their baby toes were pressed against the hard floor, which created pressure on the outermost toes. Over time, painful bumps formed in response to the continued stress. The formation itself is identical to a bunion — except that it affects the pinky, rather than the big toe. Bunionettes are often smaller, but they can enlarge to where it is difficult wearing shoes.

What Causes Bunionettes To Form?

Previously, it was thought that wearing high heel shoes caused bunions and bunionettes. Now we know that is only half-true. Researchers believe that the propensity to develop a bunionette is genetically inherited, as it’s common to see parents and offspring with bunions and bunionettes. Changes in the foot’s bone framework result in the fifth metatarsal bone protruding outward and the little toe moving inward. This natural shift becomes irritated by shoes.

How Does Dr. Geldwert & Staff Treat Bunionettes?

Here at the New York Center for Podiatric Care and Sports Medicine, we have several approaches to bunionettes. The first line of treatment is generally more conservative measures, such as changing footwear to a wider, roomier shoe with a smaller heel and extra padding. If a change of shoes does not improve your comfort level and you find it difficult to participate in daily activities, then a minimally invasive surgical procedure can be done on a same-day outpatient basis.

At the very least, bunionette surgery removes protruding inflamed soft tissue. People with a Type 1 Bunionette Deformity will need the bony outgrowth removed as well, which is called a bunionectomy. Patients with a curved fifth toe may need a cut in the bones called an osteotomy. In very rare cases, deformities require correction with wires and surgical screws. Dr. Geldwert will explain which type of procedure is best for your unique situation.

Following the procedure, you may need to wear a surgical boot or splint for three to twelve weeks. Once you are healed, you will be able to wear narrow or heeled shoes again sparingly. Most bunionettes do not come back following surgical intervention, so you can breathe a big sigh of relief! Every year, we treat thousands of patients for bunions and bunionettes. Summer is a great time to focus on your feet and take a step toward better foot health.

Are Bunions Hereditary?

Posted by on Thursday, May 23rd, 2013

A new study published in the Arthritis Care & Research journal reveals that common foot disorders — like bunions, hammertoe, and claw toe — appear to be inherited. There is increased incidence among white men and European women, the research showed. The findings are part of the Framington Foot Study, which has been looking at more than 6,000 feet over the past several years.

Should I Get Bunion Surgery?

Posted by on Thursday, May 16th, 2013

An estimated 23% of adult Americans suffer from bunions, according to a review of studies published in 2010 in the Journal of Foot and Ankle Research. More than two-thirds of people over age 65 will suffer from them, but the popularity of high heels is causing a number of young women to see doctors regarding their bunions. In fact, the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) reports that more than half of women in America get bunions, and that women are nine times as likely as men to have the problem.

Bunions are an enlargement of the big or small toe joints, caused by misalignment and (often) added bone formation. Usually they can be treated without surgery, but bunions can be unsightly enough for people to wish for their removal. One’s first impulse might be to go in for surgery and “just get rid of it.” However, the decision to get any type of surgery is a hefty one. With any type of invasive intervention, there are always risks of bleeding, poor wound healing, infection, nerve damage, and other complications.