Top Ways To Prevent Osteoarthritis of the Knee

Posted by on Tuesday, April 30th, 2013

Knee replacement surgeries are up 162 percent in the past two decades. Osteoarthritis of the knee occurs when the cartilage and underlying bone within a joint breaks down, leading to pain and stiffness. Surgery can help prevent disability, but there is no true “cure.” If you are a female over 40, then you are in the risk pool for this disease.  Many osteoarthritis patients sustained an injury while playing sports or overexerting themselves. People who have diabetes, an under-active thyroid, gout or Paget’s disease also carry a greater risk of developing osteoarthritis.

Does PinPointe Laser Work To Cure Toenail Fungus?

Posted by on Monday, April 29th, 2013

This past November, manufacturers of the PinPointe FootLaser celebrated a big milestone as the 100,000th procedure was performed. While there are several competitors on the market now, PinPointe was the very first light-based device given FDA clearance to treat the appearance of onychomycosis nail fungus. This nail fungus solution was presented as a safer, more effective alternative to oral medications.

The cost of treatment ranges from $600 to $1,000 — which is deemed a “cosmetic procedure” that is not covered by insurance; so the decision to seek laser therapy is one to seriously consider. You’re probably wondering, “Does the PinPointe FootLaser work to cure toenail fungus for good?” We have the answer for you, here at the Center for Podiatric Care and Sports Medicine.

How Do Lasers Work To Eliminate Toenail Fungus?

 

“The laser creates a thermal effect,” says Steve Duddy, president and CEO of NuvoLase, Inc., the manufacturers of PinPointe FootLaser. “Temperatures are raised to levels high enough to impact the growth of the fungus without causing discomfort to the patient,” he tells Nails Magazine. During the 30 minute treatment, patients may sense a little bit of warmth, but that’s about it. The laser is able to penetrate the nail plate to essentially cook the fungi to death. Patients can keep their toenails, simply waiting for the fungus nail to grow out  — as with most other treatments. A full recovery generally takes anywhere from four to six months, up to a year.

How Well Does the PinPointe FootLaser Work?

Clinical trials of the PinPointe FootLaser have been very encouraging. A multi-site retrospective study of 265 patients conducted by five private parties in the UK and United States reported “continuous improvement” for 71.8 percent of participants.

The success of one’s treatment depends upon the severity of the infection. “With mild-moderate cases, patients have an excellent chance of success,” explains Michael Bilinsky, D.P.M. of Beverly Hills, California. “With severe cases, clients have seen dramatic improvement, but when they expect to end up with a normal nail, they can be disappointed.”

Here at our NYC podiatrist’s office, we prefer to under-promise and over-deliver. We let patients know that success rates depend on a myriad of factors, including:

  • Genetics
  • Age
  • Health
  • Footwear
  • Hygiene, and
  • Adherence to a post-treatment plan.

Follow-up care is very important, as re-infection rates are high. “The life-cycle of fungus includes a dormant stage,” says Daniel Waldman, D.P.M. of North Carolina. He adds, “Many doctors schedule a follow-up visit not only to monitor the growth of the fungus, but also to make sure patients are performing home care.”

This home care may include a change in footwear, the use of topical treatments, disinfecting one’s shoes, and maintaining dry feet.

Are There Any Drawbacks To Laser Treatment For Fungal Nails?

Topical medications are generally considered to be ineffective for fungal nail treatment, as they cannot penetrate deep into the nail bed where infections lie. Oral medications are more effective, but side effects run the gamut from headaches to gastrointestinal upset — and require liver enzyme tests to be sure the internal organs are not overtaxed by the treatment. So, from that standpoint, the PinPointe laser (with its zero side effects) appears to be the obvious choice for treatment.

Keep in mind that there is no true way to “cure toenail fungus fast.” Laser treatment for fungal nails is not a cure, but it can temporarily improve the appearance of thickened, yellow toenails over time. We feel that laser foot fungus removal can be incredibly advantageous, but patients must be willing to comply with our recommendations for remaining fungus-free down the road.

“Just as in laser-whitening treatment of fading teeth, with laser nail treatment the fungus can come back over time,” according to Ben Pearl, DPM. He adds, “It is also important to disinfect the areas in which the fungal spores reside, so the nail does not get reinfected. There are now ultraviolet lights to do this, which are safer than many disinfectant chemical sprays.”

Gait Analysis: What To Expect

Posted by on Friday, April 26th, 2013

Our ability to run seems as natural as our ability to walk. We simply put one foot before the other and speed it up a little. Yet some medical professionals say the thoughtlessness of running could yield big problems down the line.

“So many runners just run. So many people look at a (fitness) magazine and say ‘I can do that.’ Then they get hurt and wonder why,” said Jay Dicharry, a physical therapist and author of Anatomy for Runners. “If we prepare ourselves we’ll do a better job,” he adds.

Whether it’s posture, poor foot control or over-striding, a gait analysis can be a great place to start improving your step. While this type of test is most commonly associated with long-distance runners, it’s not exclusive. Research shows that gait analysis is important in assessing and treating conditions like Alzheimer’s and arthritis too.

Who Needs Gait Analysis?

Gait analysis can provide valuable insight for runners looking to improve their speed and performance. Yet, gait analysis can also reveal abnormalities caused by disease or injury and help people who suffer from pain in their backs, hips, knees, ankles, feet, legs, or neck.

Speech therapy is helpful for cerebral palsy sufferers, but so is gait analysis. In 2003, a UK study of gait analysis found that this type of test was helpful in identifying cerebral palsy patients who needed surgical intervention. Researchers at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles concluded that “clinical gait analysis is associated with a lower incidence for additional surgery” in cerebral palsy patients and, therefore, resulted in “lesser disruption to patients’ lives.”

Arthritic patients can also benefit from gait analysis — both before and after treatments are administered. A 2001 study from Japan concluded that “techniques such as biokinetic gait analysis can provide practical information about functional joint integrity in [the rheumatoid arthritis] patient population that could aid in therapeutic decision making.”

There have been a number of studies in recent times identifying a link between cognitive function and gait. One study of 1,153 Alzheimer’s patients, conducted by researchers at the Basel Mobility Center in Switzerland, found that slower walking speed was linked with cognitive decline. The study’s lead author, Dr. Stephanie Bridenbaugh, issued a statement testifying that: “Gait analysis can simply, quickly and objectively measure walking.” She added, “When problems emerge, this may provide early detection of fall risk and the earliest stages of cognitive impairment in older adults.” A second study conducted by the Mayo Clinic found that patients with lower cadence, speed and stride length were predictive of declines in cognition, executive function, and memory 15 months later.

Many of the people we see here at the NYC Center for Podiatric Care and Sports Medicine are experiencing chronic pain and would like a clearer picture of all the factors which may be contributing to that pain. Gait analysis is an excellent way to see just what is going on.

How To Prepare For Gait Analysis

  • If you’ve never been to the clinic before, bring relevant medical records and test results from your primary doctor with you.
  • Wear comfortable shorts and your usual footwear. If you’ve recently changed footwear, bring your old pair too.
  • Plan to pay about $150 for the gait analysis (which includes a follow-up visit) — which is the same as a good pair of running shoes.

You may also want to consider asking some of the following questions at your appointment:

  • Would custom orthotics help improve my gait?
  • Are there any athletic activities that could help me?
  • Are there any athletic activities I should avoid?
  • Should I do any particular stretches each day?
  • Do you think my shoes are contributing to my problem?
  • Which type of shoes would you recommend?
  • Are there any OTC remedies I should look into?
  • What is my condition called, and where can I find more information about it?
  • How long will it take to see results from my treatment?

What Happens At Gait Analysis?

Our gait analysis procedure usually takes about an hour. First, you’ll be asked some basic questions about your day-to-day activities, such as: What surfaces do you regularly walk or run on? How many miles a week do you run? Do you use or have you ever used orthotics? Have you had any injuries? Where are you feeling pain? We’ll measure your feet and conduct a visual assessment your legs’ bone alignment, just as your general physician might. We can have you stand on a pad to check your arches and balance. We can also see where your weight is placed when you stand.

Next, you will need to take 10 consecutive steps without any assistance to achieve effective results. As you walk, we’ll examine your step length, stride length, cadence and cycle time. Runners in relatively good shape can jog on a treadmill. Through high-tech 3D video motion analysis, we’ll take joint angle measurements at normal and high speeds. Rather than use the naked eye to asses, we use 5,000 sensors on a mat that can calculate your foot step pattern and speed more precisely, as well as check the force and pressure of your steps.

Lastly, you’ll get to see the video played back, as we explain our findings. We’ll discuss all the various treatment options and give you some time to decide what you’d like to do.

Benefits of Foot Surgery

Posted by on Thursday, April 25th, 2013

In the medical world, foot surgery is viewed as a “last resort” treatment because invasive intervention is riskier by nature — not to mention, more expensive than conventional treatments. Yet, there are plenty of cases where surgery is the most sensible choice. In this article, we’ll talk about some of the procedures we do, possible benefits of foot surgery, and (of course) the risk factors involved.

Foot Pain or Issues That May Warrant Surgery

There are many types of podiatric surgery. Conditions that may warrant surgical procedures include:

  • Bunion or Bunionette
  • Hammer Toe, Claw Toe, Trigger Toe, or Mallet Toe
  • Heel Spur or Plantar Fasciitis
  • Neuroma Pain
  • Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome
  • Metatarsalgia
  • Intractable Plantar Keratosis
  • Digital Fusion
  • Hagland’s Deformity
  • Ingrown Nails
  • Warts
  • Dorsal-Adduction Deformity
  • Ganglions
  • Ulcers
  • Diabetic Wounds

10 Possible Benefits of Foot Surgery

1. Improved appearance: People born with foot deformities can enjoy better comfort and confidence in public.

2. Less pain: The American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons reports that 85-90 percent of bunion surgery patients are satisfied.

3. Improved mobility: The University of Washington Department of Sports Medicine says surgery can improve joint movement.

4. Greater footwear selection: People with foot issues either find that shoes bother their condition or they can’t fit into most shoes.

5. Response to treatment: Surgery is often used as the last resort for people who show limited or no response to other treatments.

6. Quicker recovery (in some cases): A plantar’s wart could take up to a year to treat. However, surgery recovery is just a few weeks.

7. Effective cure: In the case of recurrent ingrown toenails, fully removing the nail matrix may be the only truly curative method.

8. Infection control: Patients with diabetic wounds may need to have a deep infection controlled.

9. Prevention: Some conditions — like Duchenne muscular dystrophy — require surgery to prevent future foot deformation.

10. Relaxation: If your work gives you some paid time off for medical issues, this can be a good chance for some rest and relaxation!

Possible Risks of Foot Surgery

Foot surgery should not be taken lightly. “If something goes wrong with your foot…. you will be reminded of it every single step that you take — perhaps for the rest of your life,” writes Dr. Howard Luks. “Besides, in extreme cases, if you happen to be diabetic or have poor circulation you could potentially lose part of your foot to an amputation.”

ABC 4 News reports that pulmonary embolisms cause more deaths in the United States than “AIDS, breast cancer and motor vehicle crashes combined.” Yale School of Medicine’s Peter Blume DPM told ABC that “surgery is one of the leading causes of blood clots in patients.” Getting up and moving around after foot surgery can help prevent clotting and there is medication that can be taken as well. That being said, it’s still a risk and certain patients may be at higher risk than others — especially if they have poor circulation to begin with.

Other possible complications include: asymmetrical gait, nerve damage, complex regional pain syndrome, infection, vascular injury, and wound healing problems. Then there is also that one little caveat: surgery is no guarantee your symptoms will all be fully “cured.”

Surgery is a complex decision that is truly unique to each individual. A good doctor of podiatric medicine will be able to discuss the pros and cons of surgery for your condition, given your physical health history, in greater depth and detail than we could ever cover here. Dr. Geldwert invites readers in the New York City area to contact him personally to discuss treatment options.

Is Plantar Fasciitis An Epidemic?

Posted by on Wednesday, April 24th, 2013

Last month, the LA Times suggested that plantar fasciitis is not just commonplace in America – it’s an epidemic. “I see 18 to 20 patients a day with plantar fasciitis,” Massachusetts podiatrist Michael King told the paper. “Heel pain is epidemic. Some people just tolerate the pain and try to get by.” The American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons says approximately 2 million Americans are treated for plantar fasciitis each year. Furthermore, 10 percent of the U.S. population will suffer from plantar fasciitis at some time during their lives.

What Is Plantar Fasciitis?

Plantar fasciitis is the most common cause of heel pain, according to WebMD. It occurs when the flat band of tissue (ligament) connecting your heel bone to your toes weakens, swells and becomes inflamed. This causes a sharp stabbing pain in the heel when you walk or stand for an extended period of time. Often, the pain is worst in the morning when the body is stiffest, but it may also become bothersome later in the day after prolonged activity.

What Causes Plantar Fasciitis?

Plantar fasciitis is sometimes referred to as “policeman’s heel” because it tends to affect people who are constantly walking or standing on the job. Runners and athletes in high-impact sports like basketball or football are also particularly susceptible. Other risk factors for plantar fasciitis include:

  • Obesity
  • High arches
  • Excessive pronation
  • Worn-out shoes
  • Flip-flops or flat shoes with no arch support
  • Reduced ankle movement due to tight calf muscles or Achilles tendons

What Treatments Are Available for Plantar Fasciitis?

A combination of treatments is needed to address plantar fasciitis. The first line of defense includes resting, icing the heel, taking over-the-counter pain relievers like ibuprofen, stretching, getting a new pair of shoes with good arch support, and adding inserts with better cushion to the shoes. You should notice improvement in your condition within a few weeks to a few months.

Dr. Robert A. Kornfeld, Founder of the Institute for Integrative Podiatric Medicine, says that “total body care” is the key to curing persistent heel pain. A healthy diet — rich in omega-3 fatty acids, lean protein, whole grains, fruits and vegetables — is ideal, he says. Eating salads for dinner more often could be a good start. Supplements like probiotics, amino acids and antioxidants are important. Water consumption is a must.

Furthermore, people can be tested for food sensitivity, free radical levels, fatty acid types, and the functioning of the adrenal stress hormone. “What you want to do is focus on treating the cause of your foot pain, not mask your symptoms with medications that may actually make the problem worse,” Dr. Kornfeld explains.

Patients who do not respond to these treatments may need night splints that stretch the foot while they sleep. Injections of steroids or Botox are sometimes administered by a doctor. Surgery is rare and only recommended for patients who are unable to relieve their pain through other methods for 6 to 12 months. Here in our NYC podiatric office we can help you with any type of treatment you need.

What’s Runner’s Knee?

Posted by on Tuesday, April 23rd, 2013

Do you have pain behind the kneecap? Does it hurt to squat, kneel, run, sit, or bend your knee? Is it difficult for you to walk downhill or downstairs? Is there a popping or grinding in your knee? How about noticeable swelling? These are the symptoms of a medical condition known as patellofemoral pain syndrome — or, more colloquially, as “runner’s knee.”

What Is Runner’s Knee?

A closer inspection through a CT scan, x-ray, or MRI will help the doctor rule out other conditions and reveal internal damage to the knee. Sometimes doctors will find a tear in the meniscus, bursitis, bone or cartilage contusion, tendinopathy (a disease of the tendons), or a stress fracture instead.

If you have runner’s knee, then the pain you are feeling is the base of the femur gliding across the patella (knee cap). Usually, a smooth layer of cartilage protects you from feeling this routine movement, but some individuals soften and wear down the cartilage through injury or intense physical activity, causing the joint lining to become painfully irritated.

What Causes Runner’s Knee?

“Pinpointing a single cause of runner’s knee is difficult,” explains Runner’s World. “It could be a biomechanical problem—the patella may be larger on the outside than it is on the inside, it may sit too high in the femoral groove, or it may dislocate easily. Also, worn cartilage in the knee joint reduces shock absorption, high-arched feet provide less cushioning, and flat feet or knees that turn in or out excessively can pull the patella sideways.” Furthermore, tightened calves and hamstrings, weakened quadriceps, or even just the repetitive force of movement can trigger symptoms.

How Is Runner’s Knee Treated?

The American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons recommends the RICE treatment for runner’s knee:

  • Rest: Take a load off! If you must do something, switch to swimming, which is easy on the joints.
  • Ice: Apply cold packs for a short duration, several times a day.
  • Compression: Use an elastic band that fits snugly over the knee.
  • Elevation: Keep the knee resting above the heart as often as you can.

Pain relief through ibuprofen or aspirin is also recommended to manage the symptoms. Stretching is also important therapy. If these home care treatments do not ease your suffering, you will need to see a doctor.

How Can A Podiatrist Help?

A podiatrist can fit you with custom orthotics to correct your gait. A 2003 study found that more than 76 percent of patients with runner’s knee saw “a significant decrease in the level of pain” and the disappearance of symptoms after receiving custom orthotics. It should also be noted that these particular patients did not respond to other treatments.

Dr. Stephen M. Pribut DPM, a past President of the American Academy of Podiatric Sports Medicine, explains how the orthotics work to alleviate pain in greater detail: “Orthotics limit the maximum amount of excessive pronation. They also have been demonstrated to reduce the speed (acceleration) of internal tibial rotation. Reducing the speed of internal tibial rotation will reduce the amount of sudden stresses applied to the undersurface of the patella and the need for the VMO ( vastus medialis ) to work so hard in maintaining proper tracking and positioning of the patella. As per Newton’s Laws slower motions will require less force to counterbalance them.”

A podiatrist can also conduct a gait analysis to find out if your running or walking is contributing to the condition. If you need help learning how to wrap the knee properly, stretch, or perform regular exercises that strengthen weak muscles, ourNYC Center for Podiatric Care and Sports Medicine can help!

What’s Runner’s Knee?

Posted by on Tuesday, April 23rd, 2013

Do you have pain behind the kneecap? Does it hurt to squat, kneel, run, sit, or bend your knee? Is it difficult for you to walk downhill or downstairs? Is there a popping or grinding in your knee? How about noticeable swelling? These are the symptoms of a medical condition known as patellofemoral pain syndrome — or, more colloquially, as “runner’s knee.”

What Is Runner’s Knee?

A closer inspection through a CT scan, x-ray, or MRI will help the doctor rule out other conditions and reveal internal damage to the knee. Sometimes doctors will find a tear in the meniscus, bursitis, bone or cartilage contusion, tendinopathy (a disease of the tendons), or a stress fracture instead.

If you have runner’s knee, then the pain you are feeling is the base of the femur gliding across the patella (knee cap). Usually, a smooth layer of cartilage protects you from feeling this routine movement, but some individuals soften and wear down the cartilage through injury or intense physical activity, causing the joint lining to become painfully irritated.

What Causes Runner’s Knee?

“Pinpointing a single cause of runner’s knee is difficult,” explains Runner’s World. “It could be a biomechanical problem—the patella may be larger on the outside than it is on the inside, it may sit too high in the femoral groove, or it may dislocate easily. Also, worn cartilage in the knee joint reduces shock absorption, high-arched feet provide less cushioning, and flat feet or knees that turn in or out excessively can pull the patella sideways.” Furthermore, tightened calves and hamstrings, weakened quadriceps, or even just the repetitive force of movement can trigger symptoms.

How Is Runner’s Knee Treated?

The American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons recommends the RICE treatment for runner’s knee:

  • Rest: Take a load off! If you must do something, switch to swimming, which is easy on the joints.
  • Ice: Apply cold packs for a short duration, several times a day.
  • Compression: Use an elastic band that fits snugly over the knee.
  • Elevation: Keep the knee resting above the heart as often as you can.

Pain relief through ibuprofen or aspirin is also recommended to manage the symptoms. Stretching is also important therapy. If these home care treatments do not ease your suffering, you will need to see a doctor.

How Can A Podiatrist Help?

A podiatrist can fit you with custom orthotics to correct your gait. A 2003 study found that more than 76 percent of patients with runner’s knee saw “a significant decrease in the level of pain” and the disappearance of symptoms after receiving custom orthotics. It should also be noted that these particular patients did not respond to other treatments.

Dr. Stephen M. Pribut DPM, a past President of the American Academy of Podiatric Sports Medicine, explains how the orthotics work to alleviate pain in greater detail: “Orthotics limit the maximum amount of excessive pronation. They also have been demonstrated to reduce the speed (acceleration) of internal tibial rotation. Reducing the speed of internal tibial rotation will reduce the amount of sudden stresses applied to the undersurface of the patella and the need for the VMO ( vastus medialis ) to work so hard in maintaining proper tracking and positioning of the patella. As per Newton’s Laws slower motions will require less force to counterbalance them.”

A podiatrist can also conduct a gait analysis to find out if your running or walking is contributing to the condition. If you need help learning how to wrap the knee properly, stretch, or perform regular exercises that strengthen weak muscles, our NYC Center for Podiatric Care and Sports Medicine can help!

PinPointe FootLaser for Toenail Fungus: Top 5 Things You Need To Know

Posted by on Monday, April 22nd, 2013

Toenail fungus is not life-threatening, but this unsightly infection of the nail affects about 10 percent of the U.S. population, according to Boni E. Elewski, a researcher at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio. “The disease can have certain negative consequences for patients, such as pain, and can potentially undermine work and social lives,” she wrote in an issue of the journal Clinical Microbial Review. While this may not sound like a huge number, it is when you consider that up to 90 percent of elderly Americans have what is called onychomycosis. Traditionally, the only treatment options were to remove the affected nails or treat with risky oral antifungal medication and wait for the nail to grow out. (Even though Americans shell out loads of cash on topical antifungal medications, these are considered ineffective.) Here’s what you need to know about PinPointe FootLaser for fungal nail treatment.

1. The PinPointe FootLaser has been in use since 2007.

The Pinpointe FootLaser was developed by scientists and medical professionals over a 20-year period, with funding provided by the National Institutes of Health. Clinical studies began in November 2007 and the device received F.D.A. clearance in October of 2010 to be used as an effective treatment for fungal nails. Since then, over 3,800 patients have been successfully treated.

2. It’s quick and painless.

People generally like that they can just come right in to their regular podiatrist’s office and have the procedure done quickly by appointment, rather than waiting at a hospital or unfamiliar clinic. Any subsequent treatment is done by your own podiatrist, so you can maintain the same standard of care you have been receiving.

The PinPointe FootLaser works by using a laser light to penetrate the nail and kill the fungus, without injuring the surrounding skin. Over a period of several weeks, you should notice the nail begin to clear. However, the nail will only be fully healed once the fungus nail completely grows out. Best of all, the treatment is done in just 30 minutes as a walk in/ walk out procedure — and it’s completely painless! Some people report “warmth” and a couple individuals have reported a “slight pinprick sensation,” but most people feel nothing at all.

3.  Side effects are extremely rare.

Compared to oral medication for toenail fungus, the PinPointe FootLaser is a dream come true. The Mayo Clinic says that, while Lamisil and Sporanax are considered the “most effective” oral medications for treating toenail fungus, these drugs “may cause side effects ranging from skin rashes to liver damage.” For this reason, many people do not want to take an oral antifungal at all. Patient Joanne Grant told NBC Channel 10 News that she “didn’t want to take medication.” She added, “I didn’t want to have my liver checked.” By comparison, the PinPointe FootLaser has no regularly reported side effects. The Village Podiatry Centers in Atlanta report that “rare side effects” may include: nail discoloration, mild pain (during treatment), redness around the nail (lasting 24-72 hours), and slight swelling (lasting 24-72 hours).

4. Your insurance company won’t pay for it, but there are options.

Insurance companies consider nail fungus to be a “cosmetic procedure,” so they do not cover the cost. We understand that it’s so much more than that. No one wants to have fungus living on their feet! Even though your insurance won’t pay for PinPointe FootLaser therapy, you can still use your HSA, Medical IRA, or Flexible Spending Account.

5. Foot fungus can grow back, even after laser treatment.

While clinical studies conducted by NuvoLase found that more than 71.4% of patients experience sustained improvement after a single treatment, it is always possible for the fungus to grow back if you are not careful. Fungus is everywhere in our environment, so if you walk around barefoot on an affected surface, you are putting yourself at risk of re-infection. Furthermore, it’s important to keep your feet cool and dry to discourage fungal proliferation. So, if you are going to make the investment to have healthy, attractive feet, then you will need to commit to preventative measures too.

Types of Common Foot Injuries

Posted by on Friday, April 19th, 2013

One of the most common inquiries we get at the Healing Feet Blog is people asking whether they may have broken or sprained a foot. Often, they are not sure if they should see a doctor or just “take it easy.” Visiting a medical professional is always a wise decision, even if it is a minor injury causing you pain. We can show you how to stretch, prescribe a medication to speed up your treatment, and identify the underlying factors that contributed to your condition. Rarely is surgery or invasive treatment needed, so you don’t need to feel anxious about speaking with Dr. Geldwert or another professional.

Top 10 Reasons To Consider Foot Surgery

Posted by on Thursday, April 18th, 2013

It can be very difficult to get around with severe foot pain, especially in a fast-moving city like New York. Yet, do you really need foot surgery? Foot pain is very common, with about 75 percent of the U.S. population suffering from it at some point in their lives. Usually, improper foot wear or strenuous activity is the root cause; but the foot — by its very nature — is designed to absorb much impact. The 26 bones and 33 joints, in addition to the 120 muscles, ligaments and nerves of the foot form a complex system that can absorb a force 50 percent greater than a person’s body weight. Multiply that by the 10,000 steps the average person takes in a day and you’ve got the equivalent force of several hundred tons each day, pounding down on our feet. Injuries are bound to happen!